Computing

$5M expansion of Holyoke computing center planned by universities

HOLYOKE — The research universities which built the Massachusetts Green High-Performance Computing Center in Holyoke a decade ago announced Thursday a $5 million expansion to its computing capacity.

“Several thousand” new computer servers are planned for the 9,000-square-foot facility on Bigelow Street between Cabot and Appleton streets, according to a news release. The center opened in 2012 at a cost of $165 million. One partner, Harvard University, completed a $1.6 million expansion of the center’s computing power in 2016.

On Thursday, the center’s management promised to employ local electrical and mechanical contractors and to develop the next-generation workforce that can support future research computing operations.

Designers planned for the center to be expandable. This expansion will take place inside the building and won’t require an addition to the building.

The center said it hosts millions of virtual experiments each month, supporting tens of thousands of researchers around the world.

The new computing capacity is almost entirely powered by non-fossil fuel energy sources, according to the news release. That includes 67 megawatts of local hydroelectric and solar generation operated by Holyoke Gas and Electric.

The center was the first university research data center ever to achieve LEED Platinum Certification.

“Researchers rely on MGHPCC computing power to investigate how stars form, improve medical imaging, study ecosystem dynamics in New England coastal waters, and model the global risks of accelerating climate change, among many other impactful projects,” said MIT Vice President for Research Maria T. Zuber, a member of the MGHPCC Board of Directors.

“Expanding the computing capacity at MGHPCC meets growing demand while heeding the imperative to perform this energy-intensive research with minimal environmental impact.”

Scientists are also using the computing system to learn how medications can interrupt COVID-19 at the neural level, or create artificial neural networks that speed up — from hours to minutes 1 the calculations needed to predict earthquakes.

The computing infrastructure being added through the expansion is almost entirely powered by non-fossil fuel energy sources, the release said. That includes approximately 67 megawatts of local hydroelectric and solar generation operated by Holyoke Gas & Electric.

“Researchers rely on MGHPCC computing power to investigate how stars form, improve medical imaging, study ecosystem dynamics in New England coastal waters, and model the global risks of accelerating climate change, among many other impactful projects,” said MIT Vice President for Research Maria T. Zuber, a member of the MGHPCC Board of Directors.

“Expanding the computing capacity at MGHPCC meets growing demand while heeding the imperative to perform this energy-intensive research with minimal environmental impact.”

“In silico” computerized experimentation and data analytics have become powerful tools for knowledge discovery, according to the release. These tools take their place alongside theory, physical experimentation and observation.

“That so much science now relies on intensive computation is testament to the vision of our founding institutions and public and private partners who came together to create the MGHPCC more than a decade ago,” said John Goodhue, Executive Director of the MGHPCC. “Their vision also correctly anticipated that research enabled by the MGHPCC would become foundational to the state’s innovation-based economy. The expansion helps maintain that position of strength and will allow us to further expand our horizons.”

The Massachusetts Green High-Performance Computing Center was developed by a collaboration of Boston University, Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northeastern University and the University of Massachusetts, the state and private industry including Cisco and Dell EMC. The universities fund the ongoing operation of the data center, which is open for use by any research organization.

(This is a developing story.)

Leave a Comment